Silver Anniversary Thoughts

Posted by JonWoods JonWoods
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June 1st marks a quarter of a century that I've been in this business. I feel like I already did the big retrospective of my career five years ago in this blog when I hit the 20 year milestone, and I don't know what else I could add to that. So I'll share a few random thoughts.

This industry, like many others I suppose, has no shortage of people with large egos. I try hard not to be one of them. Although I'd like to believe my longevity has been solely because of talent, I realize that I've been remarkably lucky. There aren't too many of us who have survived for 20 years or more, and that includes some talented producers who deserved a much longer run. So how did I get this far?

I would credit a strong work ethic, a single-minded dedication to our fetish, and a stubborn nature as being crucial to reaching this anniversary. But more than that I was fortunate enough to be surrounded by supportive people who helped me get started all those years ago, and who've helped me through the difficult times during this long journey. Lorelei is the main person, of course, but I'd also like to thank my business partners at FM Concepts, Chase Brocco, Ikaras Jones, Nimzo, and all you paying customers. I would be remiss if I didn't also include Mr. Robert Harmon, who allowed me the creative freedom to find my voice in those early years.

The internet has been revolutionary for producers and customers alike. The information age has created a platform unparalleled in its egalitarianism. But that's not always a positive thing. These days anyone can, for example, publish a book, no matter how poorly written. Yes, they can bypass the publishing companies, but they also miss out on the benefits of editing, proofreading, and having an objective party question the merits of publishing the book at all. Any motivated person can host a podcast, unlike terrestrial radio, which has some minimal standards as well as sponsors to answer to. Often, ability has nothing to do with it. And now, for better or worse, anyone can go broke trying to produce their own fetish content. Back in the days of magazines and VHS tapes when I started my career, there were very few companies producing bondage entertainment. To a degree we (that is, all of the active Harmony Concepts alumni) were all finding our way, but we always strove to maintain a certain level of professionalism. With the advent of digital photography, easier access to videography and a new outlet for selling content, there was an explosion of new and often unique voices in our genre. While it was a wonderful time for people with specialized interests to express themselves, it's not too surprising they couldn't remain viable in a glutted market. I hope our commitment to upholding an acceptable standard has contributed to our long tenure in the industry.

I feel lucky that my own tastes are mainstream enough that I can try to create bondage videos that I like that will also appeal to the folks who experienced the same psychological imprinting from popular entertainment that I had. For a long time now I've felt that the people who create something, artists, writers, musicians and auteurs, are innately brave. They fearlessly reveal something about themselves when they produce their art, and open themselves to criticism as well as praise. I don't know if I'm brave (because I don't feel especially brave), and more often I feel like I'm just sharing a beloved thing with friends and like-minded people.

At the risk of wandering into negative territory, at times I find it amazing that any bondage producers — or producers of adult content in general — can manage to stay in business these days. We're plagued by credit card companies and banks that are openly hostile to us. Frequently we're subjected to ineptitude by payment processors and web hosts, and dishonest webmasters. A majority of our customer base feels entitled to get everything we produce for free, and there are wealthy, thieving tube sites that happily accommodate them. This is made worse as we get no meaningful copyright protection for our work. And yet despite these obstacles, we're all trying to continue. It's not because we have some delusion there will be a big payoff at the end, or that this situation might even get better. We do it because we must, because it's our passion. If you share this passion, all we're asking is that you help us keep on doing it.