But I Know What I Don't Like

Posted by JonWoods JonWoods
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NOTE: Some of the images in this blog entry are not mine. However, since they are being used in a commentary, it is my firm belief that this falls under the umbrella of Fair Use. If any of the copyright holders feel differently and ask me to remove any of them, I will do so immediately.



Some time ago this pathetic copy-artist posted a drawing he'd done, which looked very familiar to me since it was from a scene in "Steampunk Spies" https://clips4sale.com/6571/8612607 Since he stated it was a commissioned work, he was actually paid for it. Nonetheless the model (in this case Arielle Lane https://twitter.com/MissArielleLane ) and the owner/creator of the copyrighted source work (me) got no compensation, no acknowledgment, not even so much as a thank-you. And my work was used without permission. So I have nothing but contempt for these untalented parasites.

Later I encountered a similar piece of commissioned "artwork" that used a photo of Carissa Montgomery https://twitter.com/CarissaBound by Ropexpert https://twitter.com/Ropexpert and my annoyance and intolerance for these crap-artists surfaced again and I felt compelled to call out this bullshit on twitter.



Much to my surprise Matt Williams https://twitter.com/MWRigger responded with a comment and a photo of his significant other Dee Williams https://twitter.com/DeeWilliamsXXX side-by-side with the work of another ungrateful copy-artist.



I don't agree with Mr. Williams on one main point. I think the infringement of bondage photographers and producers by these so-called "artists" is much more prevalent than the other way around. After all, artists don't have the restrictions that those of us who produce real-life images and video do. Their figures can look precisely how they want, assume any position, be dressed in any wardrobe and placed in any setting no matter how fantastic, limited only by their own abilities and imagination. We who work with cameras are severely constrained by shrinking budgets and the human limitations of the models. Because of that, I don't know of many bondage producers who go to great effort and  expense to recreate someone else's artwork. In the past some higher-end photographers like Jim Weathers https://twitter.com/jweathersbc have done remarkable recreations of John Willie's work, but even those can never be perfect because of the way Willie stylized the proportions of his figures. So I believe the instances of artists getting taken advantage of by photographers are pretty few and far between. But if you've got any examples, I'd like to hear about them.

I would bet most of those artists whose works are being used for reference by photographers are probably not contemporary. My apologies (or sympathies) to all the living artists, but I don't see photographers using their work for inspiration. When I did my homage to "The Artless Heiress" by Robert William Meyers (who died almost 50 years ago),  it wouldn't have surprised me if the artwork had gone into public domain by now. But in any case I knew it would be impossible for me to recreate that image to the degree where it would be a copyright infringement -- if that's even applicable for photography and videos. I Googled it, and I couldn't find any mention of that, although I did find lots of legal discussion of artists ripping off photographers. Below is a side-by-side comparison of the aforementioned Arielle Lane with Ashley Lane https://twitter.com/AshleyLaneXXX for that homage seen in "The Lois Legacy." With Lorelei's invaluable assistance, I think we did a pretty good updated approximation. But I'd never be able to get nearly as close to the source material as those garbage artists who trace photos and screen-captures.



By the way,  over the years I've seen a number of examples of other artists ripping off Meyer's famous work. But because artists frequently "borrow" from each other, I don't know if The Saturday Evening Post ever bothered to take any legal action against any of them.



At this point I would like to give a shout-out to a few of the contemporary artists who I feel successfully bring their bondage vision to life in two mediums. It's rare that someone can create a photo that looks so much like their art (or is that the other way around?). Among the best are Franco Saudelli http://www.francosaudelli.com/ Dave Annis https://twitter.com/DaveAnnis60 and Chromebinder https://twitter.com/ChromeBinder Kudos, guys! Thanks for showing it can be done.

As for Mr. Williams final comment: Does it matter? In the global sense, sure, not that much. But I think it's indicative of how the rights of those who create anything that can be made into a digital file are being eroded. Copyright laws have become meaningless for the individual, and the average person can't afford a lawyer to properly deal with those who infringe on their rights. It kills the motivation to create or be innovative. In the long run, that's bad for everyone.


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Vee Vee
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Re: But I Know What I Don't Like

As an individual who commissions a decent amount of artwork, what is probably happening is the person commissioning is either asked by the artist for a reference for the artwork, or the person commissioning the artwork is providing the reference to the artist.  This is especially true when there is a language barrier.  It's much easier to show a pose than to try to describe it to someone.  I suppose you could have the artist just doing it on their own, but the former is much more likely for commissioned artwork.  

That is why portfolios matter when choosing an artist to commission, because when you see a bunch of poorly drawn elements and then suddenly it is all photo-realistic renderings, that usually speaks to them painting over/tracing from existing photographs.  That works for some, but it also severely limits what sort of end product you can get from the artist (IE, if I provided a photo of some model and asked for a specific expression, but couldn't provide a reference photo of said expression, then a less talented artist will have trouble in actually producing that).
Matt Wiiliams Matt Wiiliams
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Re: But I Know What I Don't Like

In reply to this post by JonWoods
In my day the collective of KINK directors myself excluded
would use the Bishop collection for their inspiration.

Insex back in the day was basically a rip off of Pichard’s work, and don’t forget about Gord.  

When you venture outside of DiD bondage you will find a tons of examples of producers ripping off artists.
Andre, The Toon-Man Andre, The Toon-Man
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Re: But I Know What I Don't Like

In reply to this post by JonWoods
Hey Jon,
I've talked with a few illustrators from back in the day and it was a common practice for many artists to "borrow" certain elements for their drawings.  I've seen many pulp and comic book covers that borrowed pretty heavily from time to time.  I've even seen examples of painters in the fine arts world do homages or pay tribute to other artworks!

Andre